• Elegy – Horn and Piano

    Elegy (for Herbert A. Spencer) was written to musically express both the emotions of loss and the joyful memories of his exceptional teacher. In the words of the composer ” When hopelessness and darkness seem all encompassing, an off-stage horn enters. This voice, the voice of Herb Spencer, offers serenity and reassurance to those living in his absence. Upon the on-stage horn’s re-entry, only an accompaniment without melody is heard. The voicing of the last chord in the piano crosses the accompanists' thumbs, signaling my reluctant acceptance of his passing, with hands folded.”

    Herb Spencer was professor of horn at Bowling Green State University for 29 years.  The composer was his student for the final four years. He passed away in September 2000 of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease.)

    Written as a gift to this renowned horn player’s widow, Elegy was premiered in 2005 at the 37th International Horn Society Summer Symposium by Grammy Award Winner Andrew Pelletier.

    This is an incredibly beautiful and sensitive addition to the solo horn literature by this talented composer.

    The audio excerpt is from the live premiere performance, Andrew Pelletier, soloist. (Used with permission.)

    All of the composer's royalties are being donated to The Herbert Spencer Student Horn Fund. If you wish to make an additional contribution, please send a tax deductible donation to: BGSU Foundation, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403.  Make all checks payable to “BGSU Foundation” and please write “Herbert Spencer Student Horn Fund” in the memo line of your check.

    Composer: Ryan Nowlin
    Instrumentation: F Horn & Piano
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 8:35 / 11 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $20.00
  • Equinox – Large Brass Ensemble

    Equal day, equal night, represented by double brass quintet, conical vs. cylindrical. Seating should be in an inverted V, with tuba on the outside left. Going up the left side, next to tuba is horn 3, then horn 2, horn 1 and cornet at the top of the inverted V. Coming down the right side is trumpet 1 at the top, trumpet 2, trombone 1, trombone 2 and bass trombone, facing tuba.

    Brilliantly crafted to maximize the different timbres, the wide ranges and varying instrumental combinations, this is an impressive achievement accomplished with great skill and a welcome addition to the brass repertoire.

    The sample score and mp3 excerpt include all three movements.

    Total duration: ca. 11:15

    I – Autumn (3:47)

    II – In-between (3:45)

    III – Spring (3:40)

    Performers:

    David Wailes – Cornet
    Andrew Pelletier – Horn
    Jenny Kim – Horn
    Bruce Hudson – Horn
    Doug Tornquist – Tuba
    Marissa Benedict – Trumpet
    Larry Hall – Trumpet
    Alex Iles – Trombone
    Philip Keen – Trombone
    Bill Reichenbach – Bass Trombone

    Composer: Anne McGinty
    Instrumentation: Bb Cornet, 3 F Horns, Tuba, 2 Bb Trumpets, 2 Trombones & Bass Trombone
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 11:15 / 54 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $40.00
    MP3 I. Autumn *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
    MP3 II. In-Between *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
    MP3 III. Spring *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
  • Fanfares, Questions & Answers – Large Brass Ensemble

    Written for 4 trumpets, 4 trombones (1 bass) and solo bass trombone, this is a welcome addition to the brass ensemble literature as well as a very musical piece to feature your bass trombone soloist.

    (This piece also works well with tuba as the soloist.)

    Composer: Bill Reichenbach
    Instrumentation: 4 Trumpets, 4 Trombones, Bass Trombone solo (or Tuba)
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 3:10 / 25 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $25.00
  • Feels Like Far – Mixed Quintet

    Sometimes the intimacy and intensity of a shared experience is best expressed by music. The character of each of these five instruments is retained in this unique combination, yet they blend into a new and distinct sound with timbres that are seemingly remote from the traditional sounds associated with them. This music transcends the composer's imagination and you, both the performer and the audience, have the opportunity to hear your own personal journey that feels like far.

    The sample score and sample mp3 include all three movements.

    Total duration: ca. 11:15

    Movement 1 – Slow Dancing (4:38)

    Movement 2 – Memories Of A Lost Love (4:57)

    Movement 3 – Distractions (2:36)

    Performers:

    Patti Cloud – Flute
    Don Foster – Clarinet
    Marissa Benedict – Trumpet
    Jenny Kim – Horn
    Doug Tornquist – Tuba

    Composer: Anne McGinty

    Instrumentation: Flute, Bb Clarinet, Bb Trumpet, F Horn & Tuba

    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 11:15 / 58 pages, 8.5″ x 11″

    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $40.00
    MP3 I. Slow Dancing *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
    MP3 II. Memories of a Lost Love *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
    MP3 III. Distractions *From the CD: Feels Like Far, Doug Tornquist & Friends $0.99
  • Forbidden – Horn and Piano

    Commissioned by Grammy-award winning horn player Andrew Pelletier, this very fast-paced and highly energetic piece draws its inspiration from the final moments of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s fly in his poem: The Death of the Fly (1810).

    “WITH eagerness he drinks the treach'rous potion,

    Nor stops to rest, by the first taste misled;
    Sweet is the draught, but soon all power of motion

    He finds has from his tender members fled;
    No longer has he strength to plume his wing,
    No longer strength to raise his head, poor thing!
    E'en in enjoyment's hour his life he loses,
    His little foot to bear his weight refuses;
    So on he sips, and ere his draught is o'er,
    Death veils his thousand eyes for evermore.”

    Premiered in 2006 on Andrew Pelletier’s recital entitled American Journey at Bowling Green State University, this piece begins as the fly takes his first sip of the forbidden potion. The simultaneous euphoria and terror is explored as the fly realizes his fate. With one final hurrah, he finishes his drink and “death veils his thousand eyes for evermore.”

    The audio excerpt is from the live premiere performance, Andrew Pelletier, soloist. (Used with permission.)

    Composer: Ryan Nowlin
    Instrumentation: F Horn & Piano
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 4:35 / 19 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $20.00
  • Fugue in E-Flat Major (J.S. Bach) – Brass Quintet

    “The triple fugue … is a symbol of the Trinity. The same theme recurs in three connected fugues, but each time with another personality. The first fugue is calm and majestic, with an absolutely uniform movement throughout; in the second the theme seems to be disguised, and is only occasionally recognisable in its true shape, as if to suggest the divine assumption of an earthly form; in the third, it is transformed into rushing semiquavers as if the Pentacostal wind were coming roaring from heaven.” ~ Albert Schweitzer

    The Fugue in E-Flat Major (BWV 552) has become known in English-speaking countries as the “St. Anne” because of the first theme's resemblance to the St. Anne hymn O God, Our Help in Ages Past, a hymn that would have been unknown to Bach. A fugue in three sections of 36 bars, 45 bars and 36 bars, with each section a separate fugue on a different theme, it has been called a triple fugue, although only the first theme is combined with the second and third themes; for that reason the second and third sections are sometimes referred to as double fugues. The number three is pervasive and has been understood to represent the Trinity. The description of Albert Schweitzer follows the nineteenth century tradition of associating the three sections with the three different parts of the Trinity. The number three, however, occurs many other times: in the number of flats of the key signature; in the number of sections; and in the number of bars in each section, each a multiple of 3 x 3. Each of the three themes of the fugues seems to grow from the previous ones.

    Written for organ, the ranges of each of the five fugal voices works well for the five brass instruments. Articulations and minimal dynamic suggestions have been added to honor the music, to make it sound as it would have sounded if the fugue were conceived for these modern instruments. The tuba can play m. 114 to the end down an octave to sound more like an organ pedal.

    This fugue is available for brass ensemble as well as brass quintet There are Eb trumpet parts included with the brass quintet version. The brass ensemble version has the traditional brass quintet parts, Eb trumpet parts, Eb horn, Euphonium TC and Eb tuba.

    The mp3 excerpt is from the Tower Brass Quintet CD, Road Trip. (Used with permission.)

    Composer: Anne McGinty
    Instrumentation: 2 Bb and/or Eb Trumpets, F Horn, Trombone & Tuba
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 5:30 / 28 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: Eb

    Score & Parts $21.00
  • Fugue in E-Flat Major (J.S. Bach) – Flute Choir

    “The triple fugue … is a symbol of the Trinity. The same theme recurs in three connected fugues, but each time with another personality. The first fugue is calm and majestic, with an absolutely uniform movement throughout; in the second the theme seems to be disguised, and is only occasionally recognisable in its true shape, as if to suggest the divine assumption of an earthly form; in the third, it is transformed into rushing semiquavers as if the Pentacostal wind were coming roaring from heaven.” ~ Albert Schweitzer

    The Fugue in E-Flat Major (BWV 552) has become known in English-speaking countries as the “St. Anne” because of the first theme's resemblance to the St. Anne hymn O God, Our Help in Ages Past, a hymn that would have been unknown to Bach. A fugue in three sections of 36 bars, 45 bars and 36 bars, with each section a separate fugue on a different theme, it has been called a triple fugue, although only the first theme is combined with the second and third themes; for that reason the second and third sections are sometimes referred to as double fugues. The number three is pervasive and has been understood to represent the Trinity. The description of Albert Schweitzer follows the nineteenth century tradition of associating the three sections with the three different parts of the Trinity. The number three, however, occurs many other times: in the number of flats of the key signature; in the number of sections; and in the number of bars in each section, each a multiple of 3 x 3. Each of the three themes of the fugues seems to grow from the previous ones.

    Written for organ, the ranges of each of the five fugal voices works well for flute choir. Articulations and minimal dynamic suggestions have been added to honor the music, to make it sound as it would have sounded if the fugue were conceived for these modern instruments.

    Composer: Anne McGinty
    Instrumentation: Piccolo, 4 C Flutes, Alto Flute & Bass Flute
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 5:30 / 35 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: Eb

    Score & Parts $21.00
  • Fugue in E-Flat Major (J.S. Bach) – Large Brass Ensemble

    “The triple fugue … is a symbol of the Trinity. The same theme recurs in three connected fugues, but each time with another personality. The first fugue is calm and majestic, with an absolutely uniform movement throughout; in the second the theme seems to be disguised, and is only occasionally recognisable in its true shape, as if to suggest the divine assumption of an earthly form; in the third, it is transformed into rushing semiquavers as if the Pentacostal wind were coming roaring from heaven.” ~ Albert Schweitzer

    The Fugue in E-Flat Major (BWV 552) has become known in English-speaking countries as the “St. Anne” because of the first theme's resemblance to the St. Anne hymn O God, Our Help in Ages Past, a hymn that would have been unknown to Bach. A fugue in three sections of 36 bars, 45 bars and 36 bars, with each section a separate fugue on a different theme, it has been called a triple fugue, although only the first theme is combined with the second and third themes; for that reason the second and third sections are sometimes referred to as double fugues. The number three is pervasive and has been understood to represent the Trinity. The description of Albert Schweitzer follows the nineteenth century tradition of associating the three sections with the three different parts of the Trinity. The number three, however, occurs many other times: in the number of flats of the key signature; in the number of sections; and in the number of bars in each section, each a multiple of 3 x 3. Each of the three themes of the fugues seems to grow from the previous ones.

    Written for organ, the ranges of each of the five fugal voices works well for the five brass instruments. Articulations and minimal dynamic suggestions have been added to honor the music, to make it sound as it would have sounded if the fugue were conceived for these modern instruments.

    This fugue is available for brass quintet as well as brass ensemble. There are Eb trumpet parts included with the brass quintet version. The brass ensemble version has the traditional brass quintet parts, Eb trumpet parts, Eb horn, Euphonium TC and Eb tuba.

    Composer: Anne McGinty
    Instrumentation: 2 Bb and/or Eb Trumpets, F and/or EbHorn, Trombone and/or Euphonium & Tuba
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 5:30 / 38 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: Eb

    Score & Parts $25.00
  • Getting Medieval – Trombone Choir

    This original composition for eight trombones is a very welcome addition to the literature! Written for the 2006 Dutch Bass Trombone Open, no one knows trombones like Bill Reichenbach!

    There is a youtube performance of this piece at:

    Getting Medieval

    and

    2010 Dutch Bass Trombone Open – 50 Bass Trombone players!

    Composer: Bill Reichenbach
    Instrumentation: 8 Trombones
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 3:55 / 24 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $25.00
  • Haec Dies – Flute Choir

    This joyous 6-part motet is a welcome addition to the flute choir repertoire. In polyphonic and imitative style, each voice is important to the overall structure. A student of Thomas Tallis, William Byrd was the leading English composer of his time, a great master of the Renaissance along with Giovanni Palestrina and Orlando de Lassus, and left a huge legacy of printed music. The lyrics are: “This is the day the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it. Alleluia.” Each time the word rejoice appears, the melody ascends, giving added brightness and lift. The common pronunciation of “Haec” is “eck” although it may also be pronounced as “hike.” Haec dies means this is the day.

    Composer: Anne McGinty
    Instrumentation: 5 C Flutes & Alto Flute
    Duration/# of Pages: ca. 2:15 / 13 pages, 8.5″ x 11″
    Key: N/A

    Score & Parts $15.00